1017 Glenmore Drive | P.O. Box 728 | Tower MN, 55790 | 218-753-1200 | info@glenmoreresort.com

Wildlife and Bird Watching

Both, novice and more experienced bird watchers can find a stay at the Glenmore rewarding. There are many opportunities to add numerous birds to your life-list during your stay on Lake Vermilion.The common loon is synonymous with Minnesota and our guests can relax in a comfortable cedar Adirondack chair while watching a pair of loons swim right off the end of our docks.

Numerous species of birds live in and visit, seasonally, the dense Northern Minnesota Boreal forest surrounding Glenmore Resort.

Bald Eagles can be viewed circling the resort on a bright, beautiful summer day.

Enjoy seeing Great Blue Heron feeding in the still waters adjacent to our sand beach while you enjoy a famous Lake Vermilion sunset. The Ojibwa Indians, our neighbors across the bay named Lake Vermilion for its distinctive red sunsets …. “Lake of the Sunset Glow.”

You can spot other wildlife too. Deer, rabbits, squirrels, chipmunks, and other animals fill our woods.

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BIRDS SIGHTED AT GLENMORE RESORT AND LAKE VERMILION DURING THE PAST SEVEN YEARS…

Alder Flycatcher – American Crow – American Goldfinch – American Kestrel – American Pipit – American Redstart – American Robin – Baird’s Sandpiper – Bald Eagle – Bay-breasted Warbler – Belted Kingfisher – Black-and-white Warbler – Black-backed Woodpecker – Black-capped Chickadee – Black-throated Green Warbler – Blackburnian Warbler – Blackpoll Warbler – Broad-winged Hawk – Blue-headed Vireo – Blue Jay – Brown Creeper – Brown-headed Cowbird – Canada Goose – Cape may Warbler – Caspian Tern – Cedar Waxwing – Chestnut-sided Warbler – Chipping Sparrow – Clay-colored Sparrow – Common Goldeneye – Common Grackle – Common Loon – Common Merganser – Common Raven – Common Yellowthroat – Copper’s hawk – Dark-eyed Junco – Double-crested Cormorant – Downy Woodpecker – Easter Bluebird – European Starling – Evening Grosbeak – Forster’s Tern – Fox Sparrow – Golden-crowned Kinglet – Gray Catbird – Gray Jay – Great Blue Heron – Hairy Woodpecker – Harris’ Sparrow – Hermit Thrush – Herring Gull – Hooded Merganser – House Sparrow – Horned Grebe – Horned lark – LesserScaup – Lincoln’s Sparrow – Magnolia Warbler – Mallard – Merlin – Nashville Warbler – Northern Flicker – Northern Harrier – Northern Parula – Northern pintail – Northern Shoveler – Olive-sided Flycatcher – Orange-crowned Warbler – Osprey – Ovenbird – Palm Warbler – Peregrine Falcon – Philadelphia Vireo – Pied-billed Greb – Pileated Woodpecker – Pine Siskin – Pine Warbler – Purple Finch Red Crossbill – Rose-breasted Grosbeak – Red-breasted Nuthatch – Red-breasted Merganser – Red-eyed Vireo – Red-winged Blackbirds – Red-headed Woodpecker – Red-necked Grebe – Red-tailed Hawk – Redhead – Ring-billed Gull – Rock Dove – Ruby-crowned Kinglet – Ruffed Grouse (more than a dozen live in the forest around our cabins we consider them our pets) – Savannah Sparrow – Sharp-shinned Hawk – Solitary Vireo – Song Sparrow – Spotted Sandpiper – Spruce Grouse – Swainson’s Thrush – Swamp Sparrow – Tennessee Warbler – Turkey Vulture – White-breasted Nuthatch – White-throated sparrow – White-crowned Sparrow – Wood Duck – Yellow-bellied Sapsucker – Yellow-rumped Warbler – Yellow-throated Vireo